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Fludarabine and Cladribine Induce Changes in Surface Proteins on Human B‑Lymphoid Cell Lines Involved with Apoptosis, Cell Survival, and Antitumor Immunity

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journal contribution
posted on 07.09.2012, 00:00 by Philippa L. Kohnke, Swetlana Mactier, Juhura G. Almazi, Ben Crossett, Richard I. Christopherson
Fludarabine and cladribine are purine analogues used to treat hematological malignancies. Alone or in combination with therapeutic antibodies, they are effective in treating patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. However, the mechanisms of action of these drugs are not well understood. Plasma membrane proteins perform a variety of essential functions that can be affected by malignancy and perturbed by chemotherapy. Analysis of surface proteins may contribute to an understanding of the mechanisms of action of purine analogues and identify biomarkers for targeted therapy. The surface of human cells is rich in N-linked glycoproteins, enabling use of a hydrazide-coupling technique to enrich for glycoproteins, with iTRAQ labeling for quantitative comparison. A number of plasma membrane proteins on human leukemia and lymphoma cells were affected by treatment with a purine analogue, including decreases in CD22 (an adhesion and signaling molecule) and increases in CD205 (a “damaged cell marker”) and CD80 and CD50 (T-cell interaction molecules). Purine analogues may affect B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling and costimulatory molecules, leading to multiple signals for apoptosis and cell clearance. Fludarabine and cladribine induce differential effects, with some cell survival proteins (ECE-1 and CD100) more abundant after fludarabine treatment. Cell surface proteins induced by fludarabine and cladribine may be targets for therapeutic antibodies.

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