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Conversion of Intramolecular Singlet Electron Transfer at Room Temperature into Triplet Energy Transfer at 77 K:  Photoisomerization in Norbornadiene- and Carbazole-Labeled Poly(aryl ether) Dendrimers

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journal contribution
posted on 16.03.2006, 00:00 by Jie Chen, Jinping Chen, Shayu Li, Lu Zhang, Guoqiang Yang, Yi Li
A series of Fréchet-type poly(aryl ether) dendrimers (CZ-Gn-NBD, n = 1−3) with carbazole (CZ) chromophores and a norbornadiene (NBD) group attached to the periphery and the core, respectively, were synthesized, and their photophysical and photochemical properties were investigated. Selective excitation of the carbazole units in CZ-Gn-NBD resulted in a singlet electron transfer from CZ to NBD at room temperature, and an intersystem crossing followed a triplet−triplet energy transfer from CZ to NBD in glassy 2-methyltetrahydrofuran at 77 K. Both singlet electron transfer and triplet energy transfer processes lead to the isomerization of the norbornadiene group into the quadricyclane (CZ-Gn-QC). The efficiencies and the rate constants for singlet electron transfer are approximately 88, 80, and 74% and 1.8 × 109, 6.1 × 108, and 4.0 × 108 s-1 for generations 1−3, respectively. The quantum yields of the intramolecular photosensitized isomerization are measured to be approximately 0.013, 0.012, and 0.011, and the efficiencies of triplet norbornadiene formation via singlet electron transfer are approximately 0.070, 0.065, and 0.059 for generations 1−3, respectively. The light-harvesting ability of CZ-Gn-NBD increases with the generation due to an increase of the number of peripheral chromophores. In glassy 2-methyltetrahydrofuran at 77 K, the triplet−triplet energy transfer proceeds with efficiencies of approximately 0.86, 0.64, and 0.36 and rate constants of 0.96, 0.25, and 0.08 s-1 for generations 1−3, respectively. The intramolecular singlet electron transfer and triplet energy transfer in CZ-Gn-NBD proceed mainly via a through-space mechanism involving the proximate donor (folding back conformation) and acceptor groups.

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